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Wednesday, 20 August 2014

The Bitter Sweet Story of a massive damages award

It is almost 15 years to the day since I settled what was at that time, the biggest case that I had ever handled.

John – not his real name – was born in good health. He then developed jaundice, which is not uncommon in young babies. In severe cases treatment is necessary either by phototherapy, using lights, or a full blood transfusion. So long as the condition is treated promptly there are rarely any major problems. John was born over a holiday period. The hospital staff, with the best of intentions, wanted to get the new young family home. He was discharged without being checked by a paediatrician. This was a catastrophic decision.

His condition deteriorated. By the time he was admitted to a local children’s’ hospital it was too late. He had suffered major and permanent brain damage.

This is a very oversimplified account of the medical issues but the outcome was that he had no use of his limbs, no speech and would need care from his family for the rest of his life. However, he was otherwise, as bright as the rest of us – if not more so.

Liability was disputed at first. However it seemed such a blatant case that, for the only time in my life, I applied to the High Court for summary judgment. This is a quick procedure to bring cases to a conclusion where there is no realistic argument. Surprisingly the NHS agreed and the case eventually settled for just under £2.5m which back then was a sizeable award.

There are still those who criticise victims and families for pursuing compensation claims for medical blunders. They are accused of draining the NHS and depriving other patients of the care they need. Others think of awards like this as if they were lottery wins. This could not be further from the truth. Compensation is needed to provide for the care and support necessary to give the victim a reasonable quality of life.

The reason I mention this story is that I am still in touch with the family. I have had a limited role over the years, assisting with occasional matters arising from the various trusts. So I have been able to see how the award has worked for John and his family. I met his mum recently. She told me that he has managed to get a University Degree. She said that he is now planning on working abroad for a year. Despite massive obstacles he is working toward a successful career. Now this is a tribute to John’s own determination and intelligence alongside the support from his family. But it is also a result of what has been achieved by a fair award of compensation for his injury which has provided the framework for him to develop.

We all wish that tragedies like this did not happen.

But those who go on and on about a compensation culture should, now and then, consider the real lives behind the stories.

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